Best Super Bowl commercial 2013

This one is just for fun…

Now that we’re over a week past this year’s Super Bowl, and my friends who are 49ers fans are beginning to cope with their trauma, it’s time to award the first annual Fog Blog Award for Excellence in Super Bowl Commercials.  (There’s nothing that comes with the award.  And there may not be a second annual one.  Just saying.)  It always fascinates me to see what the folks on Madison Avenue will come up with to pitch the most banal of products on such a visible and expensive stage.

It used to be that advertising was about hawking the virtues of the product.  But these days, especially during the Super Bowl, it’s all about coming up with 30 seconds of video that will be talked about and remembered.  One can always anticipate that several of the spots will come across as having been written by the cast of Animal House.  But there are some inspired moments of wacky genius.

For the funniest spot, an honorable mention goes to Oreo Cookies for the madcap mayhem in “Whisper Fight.”

But the coveted first prize goes to Tide laundry detergent, for their “Miracle Stain” ad.  They deserve extra credit for incorporating the Super Bowl into the theme of the commercial itself, a rare thing to do.  But the primary reason that the panel of judges here at the blog (okay, me, basically) have chosen this ad as this year’s winner is the firmly tongue-in-cheek reminder that football continues to be one of America’s most popular religions, even if it doesn’t make the official lists.

After all, why else would so many people stay home from church on game day?

2 thoughts on “Best Super Bowl commercial 2013

  1. You didn’t ask for peanut gallery submissions but I was mesmerized by “God made a farmer”. The late Paul Harvey certainly had a way with words.

    1. Harvey did have a way with words, including his voice, timing, and delivery; that was an interesting spot. The commercial movingly celebrated the traditions of hard work and family. At the same time, I found myself a little uncomfortable by the way the language of Genesis was hijacked to do so–with the primary purpose, of course, of selling farmers trucks.

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